Al G. Hill Jr.

Induction Year: 2019

 

Al Hill, Jr (1945-2017) was an entrepreneur, philanthropist, oilman and developer but he will forever be remembered for his involvement in modernizing tennis into the professional circuit we have today. In 1968, Hill co-founded World Championship Tennis (WCT) with his uncle, Lamar Hunt, and promoter Dave Dixon. In the span of one decade, they transformed tennis from an amateur sport into a professional powerhouse watched by millions on network television. 

 

While growing up in Dallas, Hill was one of the top 10 juniors in the nation in both singles and doubles. As an eighth grader at St. Mark's School of Texas, his tennis skills were so good that he was placed on the varsity team where he became an unprecedented 5-year letterman. Trinity University signed him to a tennis scholarship. As a Trinity Tiger, he was a team captain who amassed a singles record of 38-11.  Today, varsity home matches are played in Al G. Hill Jr. Tennis Stadium, thanks to a generous donation by Hill in 2011 that helped fund a complete renovation of the varsity tennis courts.  

 

As a highly ranked amateur player, Hill played in many prestigious events, including Wimbledon. He was a member of the United States Junior Davis Cup Team in 1962 and won the 1964 Canadian National Men's Doubles Championship.

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